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Catalog Description of Graduate Courses

(based on Registrar's Listing)

201A. VLSI Architectures and Design Methodologies. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M216A or Computer Science M258A. In-depth study of VLSI architectures and VLSI design methodologies for variety of applications in signal processing, communications, networking, embedded systems, etc. VLSI architectures choices range from ASICs, full custom approach, and special purpose processors to general purpose microprocessors. VLSI design methodologies take design specifications to implementation with aid of modern computer-aided design tools. Letter grading.

201C. Modeling of VLSI Circuits and Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 115C. Detailed study of VLSI circuit and system models considering performance, signal integrity, power and thermal effects, reliability, and manufacturability. Discussion of principles of modeling and optimization codevelopment. Letter grading.

M202A. Embedded Systems. (4)   (Formerly numbered 202A.) (Same as Computer Science M213A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Methodologies and technologies for design of embedded systems. Topics include hardware and software platforms for embedded systems, techniques for modeling and specification of system behavior, software organization, real-time operating system scheduling, real-time communication and packet scheduling, low-power battery and energy-aware system design, timing synchronization, fault tolerance and debugging, and techniques for hardware and software architecture optimization. Theoretical foundations as well as practical design methods. Letter grading.

M202B. Distributed Embedded Systems. (4)   (Formerly numbered 206A.) (Same as Computer Science M213B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 132B or Computer Science 118, and Computer Science 111. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Interdisciplinary course with focus on study of distributed embedded systems concepts needed to realize systems such as wireless sensor and actuator networks for monitoring and control of physical world. Topics include network self-configuration with localization and timing synchronization; energy-aware system design and operation; protocols for MAC, routing, transport, disruption tolerance; programming issues and models with language, OS, database, and middleware; in-network collaborative processing; fundamental characteristics such as coverage, connectivity, capacity, latency; techniques for exploitation and management of actuation and mobility; data and system integrity issues with calibration, faults, debugging, and security; and usage issues such as human interfaces and safety. S/U or letter grading.

204A. Advanced Compilers. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Computer Science 132, 251A. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Efficient allocating of shared resources (buses, function units, register files) is one of most important areas of research in modern computer architecture and compilation research. Consideration of instruction selection and scheduling, register assignment, and low-level transformation in context of concurrent microarchitecture (e.g., VLIW, superscalar, and most DSP). Topics include mapping to specific introprocessor communications buses, making effective use of hardware caches, and targeting special-purpose function units. Letter grading.

205A. Matrix Analysis for Scientists and Engineers. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: one undergraduate linear algebra course. Designed for first-year graduate students in all branches of engineering, science, and related disciplines. Introduction to matrix theory and linear algebra, language in which virtually all of modern science and engineering is conducted. Review of matrices taught in undergraduate courses and introduction to graduate-level topics. Letter grading.

208A. Analytical Methods of Engineering I. (4)   (Formerly numbered M208A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Limited to graduate students. Application of techniques of linear algebra to engineering problems. Vector spaces: scalar products, Cauchy/Schwarz inequality. Gram/Schmidt orthogonalization. Matrices as linear transformations: eigenvalues and spectrum. Self-adjoint and covariance matrices. Square root and factorization, Cholesky decomposition. Determinants, Cayley/Hamilton theorem. Minimal polynomials, Bezout theorem. Polar and singular value decomposition. Sequences, convergence, and matrix exponential. Applications to problems in signal processing, communications, and control. Letter grading.

M208B. Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering. (4)   (Formerly numbered 208B.) (Same as Mathematics M268A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 208A (or Mathematics 115A and 115B), Mathematics 131A, 131B, 132. Topics may include L^{p} spaces, Hilbert, Banach, and separable spaces; Fourier transforms; linear functionals. Riesz representation theory, linear operators and their adjoints; self-adjoint and compact operators. Spectral theory. Differential operators such as Laplacian and eigenvalue problems. Resolvent distributions and Green's functions. Semigroups. Applications. S/U or letter grading.

M208C. Topics in Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering. (4)   (Formerly numbered 208C.) (Same as Mathematics M268B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M208B. Semigroups of linear operators over Hilbert spaces; generator and resolvent, generation theorems, Laplace inversion formula. Dissipative operators and contraction semigroups. Analytic semigroups and spectral representation. Semigroups with compact resolvents. Parabolic and hyperbolic systems. Controllability and stabilizability. Spectral theory of differential operators, PDEs, generalized functions. S/U or letter grading.

209AS. Special Topics in Circuits and Embedded Systems (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of circuits and embedded systems, such as digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio frequency integrated circuits (RF ICs); electronic design automation; wireless communication circuits and systems; embedded processor architectures; embedded software; distributed sensor and actuator networks; robotics; and embedded security. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

209BS. Seminar: Circuits and Embedded Systems (2 to 4)   Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of circuits and embedded systems, such as digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio frequency integrated circuits (RF ICs); electronic design automation; wireless communication circuits and systems; embedded processor architectures; embedded software; distributed sensor and actuator networks; robotics; and embedded security. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

209S. Special Topics in Embedded Computing Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Current topics in embedded computing systems, including but not limited to processor and system architecture, real-time, low-power design. S/U or letter grading.

210A. Adaptation and Learning. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites:Recommended courses EE205A (Matrix Analysis) and EE241A (Stochastic Processes) or equivalent or consent of instructor. Prior training in probability theory, random processes and linear algebra is expected. Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Prior training in probability theory, random processes and linear algebra is expected. Recommended courses EE205A and EE241A or equivalent or consent of instructor. Mean-square-error estimation and filters, least-squares estimation and filters, steepest-descent algorithms, stochastic-gradient algorithms, convergence, stability, tracking, and performance, algorithms for adaptation and learning, adaptive filters, learning and classification, optimization. Letter grading.

210B. Inference over Networks. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Prior training in probability theory, random processes, linear algebra, and adaptation is highly recommended. Required EE210A or equivalent or consent of instructor.Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours.  Prior  training in probability theory, random processes, linear algebra, and adaptation is highly recommended. Required EE210A or equivalent or consent of instructor.  Information processing over networks. Adaptation, learning, estimation and detection over networks. Steepest-descent algorithms, stochastic-gradient algorithms, convergence, stability, tracking, and performance analyses. Distributed optimization. Information flow over networks. Synchronous and asynchronous network behavior. Incremental, consensus, diffusion, and gossip strategies. 


211A. Digital Image Processing I. (4)   Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Preparation: computer programming experience. Requisite: course 113. Fundamentals of digital image processing theory and techniques. Topics include two-dimensional linear system theory, image transforms, and enhancement. Concepts covered in lecture applied in computer laboratory assignments. Letter grading.

211B. Digital Image Processing II. (4)   Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Requisite: course 211A. Advanced digital image processing theory and techniques. Topics include modeling, restoration, still-frame and video image compression, tomographic imaging, and multiresolution analysis using wavelet transforms. Letter grading.

212A. Theory and Design of Digital Filters. (4)   Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 113. Approximation of filter specifications. Use of design charts. Structures for recursive digital filters. FIR filter design techniques. Comparison of IIR and FIR structures. Implementation of digital filters. Limit cycles. Overflow oscillations. Discrete random signals. Wave digital filters. Letter grading.

212B. Multirate Systems and Filter Banks. (4)   Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 212A. Fundamentals of multirate systems; polyphase representation; multistage implementations; applications of multirate systems; maximally decimated filter banks; perfect reconstruction systems; paraunitary filter banks; wavelet transform and its relation to multirate filter banks. Letter grading.

213A. Advanced Digital Signal Processing Circuit Design. (4)   Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 212A. Digital filter design and optimization tools, architectures for digital signal processing circuits; integrated circuit modules for digital signal processing; programmable signal processors; CAD tools and cell libraries for application-specific integrated circuit design; case studies of speech and image processing circuits. Letter grading.

M214A. Digital Speech Processing. (4)   (Same as Biomedical Engineering M214A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 113. Theory and applications of digital processing of speech signals. Mathematical models of human speech production and perception mechanisms, speech analysis/synthesis. Techniques include linear prediction, filter-bank models, and homomorphic filtering. Applications to speech synthesis, automatic recognition, and hearing aids. Letter grading.

214B. Advanced Topics in Speech Processing. (4)   Lecture, three hours; computer assignments, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course M214A. Advanced techniques used in various speech-processing applications, with focus on speech recognition by humans and machine. Physiology and psychoacoustics of human perception. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and Hidden Markov Models (HMM) for automatic speech recognition systems, pattern classification, and search algorithms. Aids for hearing impaired. Letter grading.

215A. Analog Integrated Circuit Design. (4)   Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 115B. Analysis and design of analog integrated circuits. MOS and bipolar device structures and models, single-stage and differential amplifiers, noise, feedback, operational amplifiers, offset and distortion, sampling devices and discrete-time circuits, bandgap references. Letter grading.

215B. Advanced Digital Integrated Circuits. (4)   Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: courses 115C, M216A. Analysis and comparison of modern logic families (CMOS, bipolar, BiCMOS, GaAs). MSI digital circuits (flipflops, registers, counters, PLAs). VLSI memories (ROM, RAM, CCD, bubble memories, EPROM, EEPROM) and VLSI systems. Letter grading.

215C. Analysis and Design of RF Circuits and Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 215A. Principles of RF circuit and system design, with emphasis on monolithic implementation in VLSI technologies. Basic concepts, communications background, transceiver architectures, low-noise amplifiers and mixers, oscillators, frequency synthesizers, power amplifiers. Letter grading.

215D. Analog Microsystem Design. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 215A. Analysis and design of data conversion interfaces and filters. Sampling circuits and architectures, D/A conversion techniques, A/D converter architectures, building blocks, precision techniques, discrete- and continuous-time filters. Letter grading.

215E. Signaling and Synchronization. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 215A, M216A. Analysis and design of circuits for synchronization and communication for VLSI systems. Use of both digital and analog design techniques to improve data rate of electronics between functional blocks, chips, and systems. Advanced clocking methodologies, phase-locked loop design for clock generation, and high-performance wire-line transmitters, receivers, and timing recovery circuits. Letter grading.

M216A. Design of VLSI Circuits and Systems. (4)   (Same as Computer Science M258A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, three hours. Requisites: courses M16 or Computer Science M51A, and 115A. Recommended: course 115C. LSI/VLSI design and application in computer systems. Fundamental design techniques that can be used to implement complex integrated systems on a chip. Letter grading.

M216B-M216C. LSI in Computer System Design. (4-4)   (Same as Computer Science M258B-M258C.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisite: course M216A. LSI/VLSI design and application in computer systems. In-depth studies of VLSI architectures and VLSI design tools. In Progress (M216B) and S/U or letter (M216C) grading.

M217. Biomedical Imaging. (4)   (Same as Biomedical Engineering M217.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 114D or 211A. Mathematical principles of medical imaging modalities: X-ray, computed tomography, positron-emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging. Topics include basic principles of each imaging system, image reconstruction algorithms, system configurations and their effects on reconstruction algorithms, specialized imaging techniques for specific applications such as flow imaging. Letter grading.

219A. Special Topics in Circuits and Signal Processing. (4)   Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Advanced treatment of topics selected from research areas in circuit theory, integrated circuits, or signal processing. Letter grading.

221A. Physics of Semiconductor Devices I. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Physical principles and design considerations of junction devices. Letter grading.

221B. Physics of Semiconductor Devices II. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Principles and design considerations of field effect devices and charge-coupled devices. Letter grading.

221C. Microwave Semiconductor Devices. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Physical principles and design considerations of microwave solid-state devices: Schottky barrier mixer diodes, IMPATT diodes, transferred electron devices, tunnel diodes, microwave transistors. Letter grading.

222. Integrated Circuits Fabrication Processes. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 2. Principles of integrated circuits fabrication processes. Technological limitations of integrated circuits design. Topics include bulk crystal and epitaxial growth, thermal oxidation, diffusion, ion-implantation, chemical vapor deposition, dry etching, lithography, and metallization. Introduction of advanced process simulation tools. Letter grading.

223. Solid-State Electronics I. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 124, 270. Energy band theory, electronic band structure of various elementary, compound, and alloy semiconductors, defects in semiconductors. Recombination mechanisms, transport properties. Letter grading.

224. Solid-State Electronics II. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223. Techniques to solve Boltzmann transport equation, various scattering mechanisms in semiconductors, high field transport properties in semiconductors, Monte Carlo method in transport. Optical properties. Letter grading.

225. Physics of Semiconductor Nanostructures and Devices. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223. Theoretical methods for circulating electronics and optical properties of semiconductor structures. Quantum size effects and low-dimensional systems. Application to semiconductor nanometer scale devices, including negative resistance diodes, transistors, and detectors. Letter grading.

229. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Solid-State Electronics. (4)   Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 223, 224. Current research areas, such as radiation effects in semiconductor devices, diffusion in semiconductors, optical and microwave semiconductor devices, nonlinear optics, and electron emission. Letter grading.

229S. Advanced Electrical Engineering Seminar. (2)   Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Preparation: successful completion of Ph.D. major field examination. Seminar on current research topics in solid-state and quantum electronics (Section 1) or in electronic circuit theory and applications (Section 2). Students report on a tutorial topic and on a research topic in their dissertation area. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

230A. Estimation and Detection in Communication and Radar Engineering. (4)   Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Applications of estimation and detection concepts in communication and radar engineering; random signal and noise characterizations by analytical and simulation methods; mean square (MS) and maximum likelihood (ML) estimations and algorithms; detection under ML, Bayes, and Neyman/Pearson (NP) criteria; signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and error probability evaluations. Letter grading.

230B. Digital Communication Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 132A, 230A. Basic concepts of digital communication systems; representation of bandpass waveforms; signal space analysis and optimum receivers in Gaussian noise; comparison of digital modulation methods; synchronization and adaptive equalization; applications to modern communication systems. Letter grading.

230C. Algorithms and Processing in Communication and Radar. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 230A. Concepts and implementations of digital signal processing algorithms in communication and radar systems. Optimum dynamic range scaling for random data. Algorithms for fast convolution and transform. Spectral estimation algorithms. Parallel processing, VLSI algorithms, and systolic arrays. Letter grading.

230D. Signal Processing in Communications. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 230C. Basic digital signal processing techniques for estimation and detection of signals in communication and radar systems. Optimization of dynamic range, quantization, and state constraints; DFT, convolution, FFT, NTT, Winograd DFT, systolic array; spectral analysis-windowing, AR, and ARMA; system applications. Letter grading.

231A. Information Theory: Channel and Source Coding. (4)   Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Fundamental limits on compression and transmission of information. Topics include limits and algorithms for lossless data compression, channel capacity, rate versus distortion in lossy compression, and information theory for multiple users. Letter grading.

231E. Channel Coding Theory. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Fundamentals of error control codes and decoding algorithms. Topics include block codes, convolutional codes, trellis codes, and turbo codes. Letter grading.

232A. Stochastic Modeling with Applications to Telecommunication Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Introduction to stochastic processes as applied to study of telecommunication systems and traffic engineering. Renewal theory; discrete-time Markov chains; continuous-time Markov jump processes. Applications to traffic and queueing analysis of basic telecommunication system models. Letter grading.

232B. Telecommunication Switching and Queueing Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 232A. Queue modeling and analysis with applications to space-time digital switching systems and to integrated-service telecommunication systems. Fundamentals of traffic engineering and queueing theory. Queue size, waiting time, busy period, blocking, and stochastic process analysis for Markovian and non-Markovian models. Letter grading.

232C. Telecommunication Architecture and Networks. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 232B. Analysis and design of integrated-service telecommunication networks and multiple-access procedures. Stochastic analysis of priority-based queueing system models. Queueing networks; network protocol architectures; error control; routing, flow, and access control. Applications to local-area, packet-radio, satellite, and computer communication networks. Letter grading.

232D. Telecommunication Networks and Multiple-Access Communications. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 232B. Performance analysis and design of telecommunication networks and multiple-access communication systems. Topics include architectures, multiplexing and multiple-access, message delays, error/flow control, switching, routing, protocols. Applications to local-area, packet-radio, local-distribution, computer and satellite communication networks. Letter grading.

232E. Graphs and Network Flows. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 136. Solution to analysis and synthesis problems which may be formulated as flow problems in capacity constrained (or cost constrained) networks. Development of tools of network flow theory using graph theoretic methods; application to communication, transportation, and transmission problems. Letter grading.

233A. Wireless Communication Theory. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 230B. Discussion of theory of physical layer and medium access design for wireless communications. Topics include wireless signal propagation and channel modeling, information theoretic studies of wireless models, performance analysis, single carrier and spread spectrum modulation for wireless systems, diversity techniques, multiple-access schemes. Letter grading.

233B. Wireless Communications Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 230B. Various aspects of physical layer and medium access design for wireless communications systems. Topics include wireless signal propagation and channel modeling, single carrier and spread spectrum modulation for wireless systems, diversity techniques, multiple-access schemes, transceiver design and effects of nonideal components, hardware partitioning issues. Case study highlights system level trade-offs. Letter grading.

236A. Linear Programming. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Mathematics 115A or equivalent knowledge of linear algebra. Basic graduate course in linear optimization. Geometry of linear programming. Duality. Simplex method. Interior-point methods. Decomposition and large-scale linear programming. Quadratic programming and complementary pivot theory. Engineering applications. Introduction to integer linear programming and computational complexity theory. Letter grading.

236B. Nonlinear Programming. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 236A. Basic graduate course in nonlinear programming. Convex sets and functions. Engineering applications and convex optimization. Lagrange duality, optimality conditions, and theorems of alternatives. Unconstrained minimization methods. Convex optimization methods (interior-point methods, cutting-plane methods, ellipsoid algorithm). Lagrange multiplier methods and sequential quadratic programming. Letter grading.

236C. Optimization Methods for Large-Scale Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 236B. Theory and computational procedures for decomposing large-scale optimization problems: cutting-plane methods, column generation, decomposition algorithms. Techniques for global continuous optimization: branch-and-bound methods, reverse convex programming, bilinear and biconvex optimization, genetic algorithms, simulated annealing. Introduction to combinatorial optimization. Letter grading.

M237. Dynamic Programming. (4)   (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M276.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisite: course 232A or 236A or 236B. Introduction to mathematical analysis of sequential decision processes. Finite horizon model in both deterministic and stochastic cases. Finite-state infinite horizon model. Methods of solution. Examples from inventory theory, finance, optimal control and estimation, Markov decision processes, combinatorial optimization, communications. Letter grading.

238. Multimedia Communications and Processing. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 113, 131A. Key concepts, principles, and algorithms of real-time multimedia communications and processing across heterogeneous Internet and wireless channels. Due to flexible and low-cost infrastructure, new networks and communication channels enable variety of delay-sensitive multimedia transmission applications and provide varying resources with limited support for quality of service required by delay-sensitive, bandwidth-intense, and loss-tolerant multimedia applications. Variability of resources does not significantly impact delay-insensitive applications (e.g., file transfers) but has consequences for multimedia applications and leads to new challenges. Concepts, theories, and solutions that have dominated information theory, communications, and signal processing areas are not entirely suited for time-varying channel characteristics, adaptive and delay-sensitive multimedia applications, and multiuser transmission environments. Letter grading.

239AS. Special Topics in Signals and Systems (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of signals and systems, such as communications, control, image processing, information theory, multimedia, computer networking, optimization, speech processing, telecommunications, and VLSI signal processing. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

239BS. Seminar: Signals and Systems (4)   Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of signals and systems, such as communications, control, image processing, information theory, multimedia, computer networking, optimization, speech processing, telecommunications, and VLSI signal processing. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

M240A. Linear Dynamic Systems. (4)   (Same as Chemical Engineering M280A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 141 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A. State-space description of linear time-invariant (LTI) and time-varying (LTV) systems in continuous and discrete time. Linear algebra concepts such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values, Cayley/Hamilton theorem, Jordan form; solution of state equations; stability, controllability, observability, realizability, and minimality. Stabilization design via state feedback and observers; separation principle. Connections with transfer function techniques. Letter grading.

240B. Linear Optimal Control. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 141, M240A. Introduction to optimal control, with emphasis on detailed study of LQR, or linear regulators with quadratic cost criteria. Relationships to classical control system design. Letter grading.

M240C. Optimal Control. (4)   (Same as Chemical Engineering M280C and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 240B. Applications of variational methods, Pontryagin maximum principle, Hamilton/Jacobi/Bellman equation (dynamic programming) to optimal control of dynamic systems modeled by nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Letter grading.

241A. Stochastic Processes. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131B. Random process models: basic concepts, properties. Stationary random processes: covariance and spectrum. Response of linear systems to random inputs: discrete-time and continuous-time models. Time averages and ergodic principle. Sampling principle and interpolation. Simulation of random processes. Letter grading.

241B. Kalman Filtering. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M240A, 241A. Review of state-space theory: Kalman signal generation model. Statistical estimation theory: maximum likelihood principle, optimum mean square estimation, conditional expectation, Wiener/Hopg equation, Gaussian signals and Gram/Schmidt orthogonalization, factorization, maximum unconditional likelihood. Kalman filter: basic theory, error propagation/steady state convergence theory, examples, applications to system parameter identification, Kalman filtering software. Kalman smoother algorithm. Nonlinear extensions, likelihood ratios for Gaussian signal. Letter grading.

241C. Stochastic Control. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 240B, 241B. Linear quadratic Gaussian theory of optimal feedback control of stochastic systems; discrete-time state-space models; sigma algebra equivalence and separation principle; dynamic programming; compensator design for time invariant systems; feedforward control and servomechanisms, extensions to nonlinear systems; applications to interception guidance, gust alleviation. Letter grading.

M242A. Nonlinear Dynamic Systems. (4)   (Same as Chemical Engineering M282A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M272A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M240A or Chemical Engineering M280A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A. State-space techniques for studying solutions of time-invariant and time-varying nonlinear dynamic systems with emphasis on stability. Lyapunov theory (including converse theorems), invariance, center manifold theorem, input-to-state stability and small-gain theorem. Letter grading.

243. Robust and Optimal Control by Convex Methods. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M240A. Multivariable robust control, including H2 and H-infinity optimal control and robust performance analysis and synthesis against structured uncertainty. Emphasis on convex methods for analysis and design, in particular linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach to control. Letter grading.

M248S. Seminar: Systems, Dynamics, and Control Topics. (2)   (Same as Chemical Engineering M297 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M299A.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Limited to graduate engineering students. Presentations of research topics by leading academic researchers from fields of systems, dynamics, and control. Students who work in these fields present their papers and results. S/U grading.

249S. Topics in Control. (4)   Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Thorough treatment of one or more aspects of control theory and applications, such as computational methods for optimal control; stability of distributed systems; identification; adaptive control; nonlinear filtering; differential games; applications to flight control, nuclear reactors, process control, biomedical problems. May be repeated for credit with topic change. Letter grading.

CM250A. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (4)   (Formerly numbered M250A.) (Same as Biomedical Engineering CM250A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM280A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM250L. Introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students design microfabrication processes capable of achieving desired MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM150. Letter grading.

M250B. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Fabrication. (4)   (Same as Biomedical Engineering M250B and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M280B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course CM150 or CM250A. Advanced discussion of micromachining processes used to construct MEMS. Coverage of many lithographic, deposition, and etching processes, as well as their combination in process integration. Materials issues such as chemical resistance, corrosion, mechanical properties, and residual/intrinsic stress. Letter grading.

CM250L. Introduction to Micromachining and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Laboratory. (2)   (Same as Biomedical Engineering CM250L and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM280L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, one hour. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20L, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Corequisite: course CM250A. Hands-on introduction to micromachining technologies and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) laboratory. Methods of micromachining and how these methods can be used to produce variety of MEMS, including microstructures, microsensors, and microactuators. Students go through process of fabricating MEMS device. Concurrently scheduled with course CM150L. Letter grading.

M252. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design. (4)   (Formerly numbered M250B.) (Same as Biomedical Engineering M252 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M282.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading.

M257. Nanoscience and Technology. (4)   (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M287.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to fundamentals of nanoscale science and technology. Basic physical principles, quantum mechanics, chemical bonding and nanostructures, top-down and bottom-up (self-assembly) nanofabrication; nanocharacterization; nanomaterials, nanoelectronics, and nanobiodetection technology. Introduction to new knowledge and techniques in nano areas to understand scientific principles behind nanotechnology and inspire students to create new ideas in multidisciplinary nano areas. Letter grading.

259S. Seminar: Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). (2)   Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Seminar on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Letter grading.

260A-260B. Advanced Engineering Electrodynamics. (4-4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 161, 162A. Advanced treatment of concepts in electrodynamics and their applications to modern engineering problems. Waves in anisotropic, inhomogeneous, and dispersive media. Guided waves in bounded and unbounded regions. Radiation and diffraction, including optical phenomena. Partially coherent waves, statistical media. Letter grading.

261. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Circuits. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 163A. Rectangular and circular waveguides, microstrip, stripline, finline, and dielectric waveguide distributed circuits, with applications in microwave and millimeter wave integrated circuits. Substrate materials, surface wave phenomena. Analytical methods for discontinuity effects. Design of passive microwave and millimeter wave circuits. Letter grading.

262. Antenna Theory and Design. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 162A. Antenna patterns. Sum and difference patterns. Optimum designs for rectangular and circular apertures. Arbitrary side lobe topography. Discrete arrays. Mutual coupling. Design of feeding networks. Letter grading.

263. Reflector Antennas Synthesis, Analysis, and Measurement. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 260A, 260B. Reflector pattern analysis techniques. Single and multireflector antenna configurations. Reflector synthesis techniques. Reflector feeds. Reflector tolerance studies, including systematic and random errors. Array-fed reflector antennas. Near-field measurement techniques. Compact range concepts. Microwave diagnostic techniques. Modern satellite and ground antenna applications. Letter grading.

266. Computational Methods for Electromagnetics. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 162A, 163A. Computational techniques for partial differential and integral equations: finite-difference, finite-element, method of moments. Applications include transmission lines, resonators, integrated circuits, solid-state device modeling, electromagnetic scattering, and antennas. Letter grading.

270. Applied Quantum Mechanics. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: modern physics (or course 123A), linear algebra, and ordinary differential equations courses. Principles of quantum mechanics for applications in lasers, solid-state physics, and nonlinear optics. Topics include eigenfunction expansions, observables, Schrödinger equation, uncertainty principle, central force problems, Hilbert spaces, WKB approximation, matrix mechanics, density matrix formalism, and radiation theory. Letter grading.

271. Classical Laser Theory. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 172. Microscopic and macroscopic laser phenomena and propagation of optical pulses using classical formalism. Letter grading.

272. Dynamics of Lasers. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 271. Ultrashort laser pulse characteristics, generation, and measurement. Gain switching, Q switching, cavity dumping, active and passive mode locking. Pulse compression and soliton pulse formation. Nonlinear pulse generation: soliton laser, additive-pulse mode locking, and parametric oscillators. Pulse measurement techniques. Letter grading.

273. Nonlinear Optics. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 172, 270. Nonlinear optical susceptibilities. Coupled-wave formulation. Crystal optics, electro-optics, and magneto-optics. Sum- and difference-frequency generation. Harmonic and parametric generation. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering. Four-wave mixing and phase conjugation. Field-induced index changes and self-phase modulation. Letter grading.

274. Fiber Optic System Design. (4)   Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: courses 173DL and/or 174. Top-down introduction to physical layer design in fiber optic communication systems, including Telecom, Datacom, and CATV. Fundamentals of digital and analog optical communication systems, fiber transmission characteristics, and optical modulation techniques, including direct and external modulation and computer-aided design. Architectural-level design of fiber optic transceiver circuits, including preamplifier, quantizer, clock and data recovery, laser driver, and predistortion circuits. Letter grading.

279AS. Special Topics in Physical and Wave Electronics (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of physical and wave electronics, such as electromagnetics, microwave and millimeter wave circuits, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, microelectromechanical systems, solid state, and nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

279BS. Seminar: Physical and Wave Electronics (2 to 4)   Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of physical and wave electronics, such as electromagnetics, microwave and millimeter wave circuits, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, microelectromechanical systems, solid state, and nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

279S. Special Topics in Quantum Electronics. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Current research topics in quantum electronics, lasers, nonlinear optics, optoelectronics, ultrafast phenomena, fiber optics, and lightwave technology. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

285A. Plasma Waves and Instabilities. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101, and M185 or Physics M122. Wave phenomena in plasmas described by macroscopic fluid equations. Microwave propagation, plasma oscillations, ion acoustic waves, cyclotron waves, hydromagnetic waves, drift waves. Rayleigh/Taylor, Kelvin/Helmholtz, universal, and streaming instabilities. Application to experiments in fully and partially ionized gases. Letter grading.

285B. Advanced Plasma Waves and Instabilities. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M185, and 285A or Physics 222A. Interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with plasmas: waves in inhomogeneous and bounded plasmas, nonlinear wave coupling and damping, parametric instabilities, anomalous resistivity, shock waves, echoes, laser heating. Emphasis on experimental considerations and techniques. Letter grading.

M287. Fusion Plasma Physics and Analysis. (4)   (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M237B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M185. Fundamentals of plasmas at thermonuclear burning conditions. Fokker/Planck equation and applications to heating by neutral beams, RF, and fusion reaction products. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, and atomic radiation processes. Plasma surface interactions. Fluid description of burning plasma. Dynamics, stability, and control. Applications in tokamaks, tandem mirrors, and alternate concepts. Letter grading.

295. Technical Writing for Electrical Engineers. (2)   Lecture, two hours. Designed for electrical engineering Ph.D. students. Opportunity for students to improve technical writing skills by revising conference, technical, and journal papers and practicing writing about their work for undergraduate audience (potential students), engineers outside their specific fields, and nonscientists (colleagues with less expertise in field and policymakers). Students write in variety of genres, all related to their professional development as electrical engineers. Emphasis on writing as vital way to communicate precise technical and professional information in distinct contexts, directly resulting in specific outcomes. S/U grading.

296. Seminar: Research Topics in Electrical Engineering. (2)   Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in electrical engineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

297. Seminar Series: Electrical Engineering. (1)   Seminar, 90 minutes; outside study, 90 minutes. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Weekly seminars and discussion by invited speakers on research topics of heightened interest. S/U grading.

298. Seminar: Engineering. (2 to 4)   Seminar, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Seminars may be organized in advanced technical fields. If appropriate, field trips may be arranged. May be repeated with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

299. M.S. Project Seminar. (4)   Seminar, to be arranged. Required of all M.S. students not in thesis option. Supervised research in small groups or individually under guidance of faculty mentor. Regular meetings, culminating report, and presentation required. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Graduate Student Affairs. Letter grading.

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 to 4)   Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

475C. Manufacturing Systems. (4)   Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 475B. Modeling and analysis of manufacturing systems. Assembly and transfer lines. Facility layout and design. Group technology and flexible manufacturing systems. Planning and scheduling. Task management, machine setup, and operation sequencing. Manufacturing system models. Manufacturing information systems. Social, economic, environmental, and regulatory issues. Letter grading.

596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies. (2 to 8)   Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from assistant dean, Graduate Studies. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination. (2 to 12)   Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations. (2 to 16)   Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. S/U grading.

597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination. (2 to 16)   Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis. (2 to 12)   Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (2 to 16)   Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.

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