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Home Events Events Archive 2012 Frequency Synthesis Using Concurrency: Reaching a Solution to a Few Classical and Hard-Headed RF and mm-wave Integrated Circuit Problems

Frequency Synthesis Using Concurrency: Reaching a Solution to a Few Classical and Hard-Headed RF and mm-wave Integrated Circuit Problems

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What
  • PhD Defenses
When May 22, 2012
from 03:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where ENGR. IV Bldg. Tesla Room 53-125
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Alborz Jooyaie

Advisor: Prof. M.C. Frank Chang

 

Abstract:

Microwave and RF integrated circuit design is considered a black art by many, in the sense of balancing a game amongst various tradeoffs involved. The demand for high definition media and connectivity products, have mandated the use of complex modulation schemes and/or an increase in the frequency band of operation to buy additional bandwidth. Meeting the dynamic range requirements, peak to average ratios, and wide-bandwidth, as well as the resolution and sensitivity of these emerging technologies/products often pushes the CMOS process to the limits of impossibility. In order to deliver and perform, thus meeting the demands, novel techniques and topologies are needed rather than optimization and tweaking.

A good switch is always in demand, particularly when frequency increases. Wideband frequency synthesis, as well as other blocks, relies on switching the bands in order to achieve a wide-band operation, or an optimized, high performance operation.  As such, the switch is in the signal path and while bringing certain benefits, its artifacts would also introduce degradations in certain aspects of the signal propagation. What if the switch is used indirectly, so that it would diminish the performance of what you don’t like, while not affecting what you do like?   

This talk presents a novel approach to switching, relying on a mathematical possibility existing in the universe: concurrency and chaos. Exploiting this, frequency synthesizer elements are realized that are able to achieve much extended bandwidth and superior performance to what has been the state of the art, thus introducing a new design technique to address the previous limitations.  

Biography:

Alborz Jooyaie received his B.Sc. in electrical engineering at University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Canada. He obtained his MS degree in electrical engineering at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He has held various RF design engineering positions, while doing internship at Texas Instruments and PMC-Sierra.

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