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Home Events Events Archive 2012 Use of the Extended Speech Intelligibility Index (ESII) and the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) to Quantify Functional Hearing Ability

Use of the Extended Speech Intelligibility Index (ESII) and the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) to Quantify Functional Hearing Ability

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What
  • Visitor Seminars
When Oct 07, 2011
from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Where 54-134 Engineering IV Building
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Dr. Sigfrid D. Soli

House Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA

 

Abstract:


The Extended Speech Intelligibility Index (ESII) is used to predict the speech reception
thresholds (SRT) in real-world fluctuating noise environments. For individuals with normal
hearing the ESII at the SRT is typically about 0.34. Likewise, the ESII for a HINT threshold
of -2.6 dB S/N—the norm for the Noise Front test condition, which is most similar to the
conditions under which the ESII is calculated—is 0.35. Thresholds above the norm indicate that
a larger ESII is needed to achieve the same level of intelligibility. This relationship between the
ESII and HINT threshold elevation can be used to quantify the impact of threshold elevation on
functional hearing ability, especially speech communication, in real-world noise environments.

This presentation describes research to establish and validate hearing screening criteria
based on HINT thresholds and ESII analyses of their workplace noise environments. Elevation
of a HINT threshold above the norm increases the ESII criterion value and thus reduces the
likelihood of effective communication. For example, a 1 dB threshold increase corresponds
to an increase in the ESII of approximately 0.03. Using this relationship, it is possible to make
quantitative estimates of the impact of threshold elevation on the likelihood of effective
communication during hearing-critical activities on the job and, in so doing, to establish and
validate hearing screening criteria for specific jobs and workplaces.

Biography:

Dr. Soli is Vice President, Technology Transfer, and a Distinguished Scientist Emeritus at
the House Research Institute. His laboratory develops and evaluates hearing diagnostics,
assessment procedures, and devices for individuals for hearing impairment. He has advised
the NIDCD on hearing aid research the National Research Council on functional hearing
assessment. He has also served as a consultant to the FDA’s Ear Nose and Throat Device Panel
and is a Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America. He is a Senior International Advisor to
the Chinese Academy of Audiological Rehabilitation and to the Chinese Rehabilitation and
Research Center for Disabled Children in Beijing, China.

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