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Home Events Events Archive 2013 Effect of surfactants on the induced electro-osmotic flow in PMMA microcapillaries and a rapid detection technique for a target protein through combination of immunodepletion and microfluidic separation.

Effect of surfactants on the induced electro-osmotic flow in PMMA microcapillaries and a rapid detection technique for a target protein through combination of immunodepletion and microfluidic separation.

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What
  • PhD Defenses
When Mar 26, 2013
from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM
Where Engr. IV Bldg., Maxwell Room 57-124
Contact Name
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Glareh Azadi

Ph.D candidate at Brown University

 

Abstract

Electrokinetics is a classic phenomenon at the heart of colloid and interface science, with more than two centuries of research history.  Electro-osmotic flow (EOF) has gained increasing attention in the field of micro and nanofluidics due to the relative ease of manipulation in applications such as biological and chemical sensors, pumps, and electrophoretic separation of proteins and nucleic acids. Addition of surfactants which are adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface alters the charge density and significantly affects the magnitude of electro-osmotic(EO) mobility and the direction of EOF. Control of EOF has been proven challenging in polymeric based substrates such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a substitute for glass based microfluidics.  In this talk, I will present the effect of three classes of surfactants: cationic hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS) and non-ionic polyoxyethylene lauryl ether(Brij35), as well as neutral polymers hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and poly dimethyl acrylamide(PDMA) on EOF in PMMA microcapillaries. Based on the surface charge of PMMA, these additives affect the magnitude of EO mobility and the direction of flow. Furthermore, effect of chemical structure such as chain length on EO mobility was evaluated with three cationic surfactants with various chain length CTAB: C16, trimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB: C14), and dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB:C12).

In the second part of my talk, I will present a rapid method for detection of a target protein through combination of immunodepletion and microfluidic separation. Compare to conventional techniques such as Western Blotting, detection and quantification of the target can be achieved in order of minutes without the need for multiple washing and incubation steps.

 

Biography

Glareh Azadi is currently a Ph.D candidate in Center for Biomedical Engineering at Brown University under the supervision of Prof. Anubhav Tripathi. She received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from University of New Hampshire in 2008.

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