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Ideal Diodes, Hot Swap, and Surge Stoppers –Integrated Circuits for the Power Path

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What
  • Seminar Series
When May 20, 2013
from 01:00 PM to 02:30 PM
Where Engr. IV Bldg., Shannon Room 54-134
Contact Name
Contact Phone 310-825-9490
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Chris Umminger

Linear Technology Corporation

 

Abstract

There is a world of power electronics and challenges in the “power path”. Examples include drawing power from disparate sources, measuring power, providing redundant power and protecting systems from faults. Faults may include shorts, hot or live connection, reversed connection, and over- and undervoltage conditions. The desire for more energy efficiency and failure tolerance has increased the demand for cost-effective measurement and protection circuits. Applications range from automobiles to data centers. This talk will discuss some of these problems and trends with a focus on the integrated circuit solutions and difficulties. 

 

Biography

Chris Umminger is a design manager for integrated circuits in the Mixed Signal business unit at Linear Technology. He oversees the definition and circuit design for Hot Swap, Ideal Diode, Surge Stopper, Supply Monitor, and I2C products. These products generally relate to controlling and managing power in a variety of industrial and consumer applications. Prior to his management position, he designed integrated circuit controllers for switching regulators at LTC. These included the first DC/DC down converters that sensed current using the switch voltage drop rather than a current sense resistor. As a student, he trained in circuit design working on analog integrated circuits for focal plane image processing. He received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1988 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1990 and 1995. 

 

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