Personal tools
Home Events Events Archive 2014 Entrepreneurial adventures with Light Scattering: Helping to Restore the Nation’s Manufacturing Base

Entrepreneurial adventures with Light Scattering: Helping to Restore the Nation’s Manufacturing Base

— filed under:

What
  • Visitor Seminars
When Nov 01, 2013
from 02:00 PM to 03:00 PM
Where Engr. IV Bldg., Maxwell Room 57-124
Contact Name
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

Philip J. Wyatt, Ph.D.

Chief Executive Officer

Wyatt Technology Corporation, Santa Barbara, CA

 

Abstract
In the recent report from our National Academies entitled “Rising above the gathering clouds revisited: Rapidly approaching Category 5,” the need to create new manufacturing jobs in our country was underscored as the essential element needed to restore the Nation’s place in the world. Indeed, for each “…job directly created in the chain of manufacturing activity generates, on average, another 2.5 jobs in such unrelated endeavors as operating restaurants, grocery stores, barber shops, filling stations and banks….” Creating such new jobs invariably requires the formation of new entities generally based upon entrepreneurial ideas. The creation of such firms, however, is often fraught with great dangers both for the entrepreneur and her/his investors. The speaker traces many of these elements in the brief history and discussion of his 31-year “adventure” with the light scattering technology on which his firm is based.

Biography
Philip J. Wyatt is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Wyatt Technology Corporation (www.wyatt.com) which, for the past 5 years, has been named by The Scientist magazine as “One of the best places to work in the world.” He received his undergraduate education in liberal arts, physics and mathematics at the University of Chicago, and Christ's College, Cambridge. His graduate education was completed at the University of Illinois (M.S.) and the Florida State University (Ph.D.). The author of more than seventy articles, Wyatt has co-authored or contributed to eleven books, and was nominated by the National Academy of Sciences as one of fifteen finalists for this country's first Scientist-Astronaut Selection Program. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The American Physical Society, and the Optical Society of America. He has had over thirty foreign and domestic patents issued relating to laser light scattering and other technologies. Wyatt is the American Physical Society’s 2009 recipient of the Prize for Industrial Applications of Physics with the citation: "For pioneering developments in the physics of the inverse scattering problem: new applications of laser light scattering and the successful sustained commercialization of new related analytical methods and instrumentation.”

Document Actions