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Tungsten Silicide Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector Arrays for Deep-Space Optical Communication and Quantum Optics

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What
  • Visitor Seminars
When Jul 01, 2014
from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM
Where Engr. IV Bldg., Maxwell Room 57-124
Contact Name
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Matt Shaw

Superconducting Devices and Materials Group

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA

 

Abstract

Tungsten Silicide Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors (WSi SNSPDs) are a transformative new technology for single photon detection in the near- and mid-infrared. They have recently demonstrated over 90% system detection efficiency at 1.55 microns, with 150 ps time resolution, 40 ns reset times, sub-hertz intrinsic dark count rates, mid-infrared sensitivity to 5 microns, and a 1 K operating temperature. We have recently developed free-space and fiber-coupled WSi SNSPD arrays with as many as 64 pixels, along with advanced cryogenic readout electronics. We will discuss this work in the context of NASA's interest in deep-space optical communication, as well as their potential in other applications including quantum communication, high time resolution astrophysics, and lidar. We will also discuss recent efforts to integrate WSi SNSPDs with on-chip SiN photonics. 


Biography

Matt Shaw is a member of the Superconducting Devices and Materials Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Prior to joining JPL in 2011, he was a postdoctoral researcher in Applied Physics at Caltech, and received a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Southern California in 2009. He was born and raised in Fairbanks, Alaska.

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