Speaker: Dr. Paul Hurley
Affiliation: Senior Research Scientist, Tyndall National Institute

Abstract:  The solid-state transistor and the laser are two 20th Century inventions which are at the heart of the information and communication age. The use of semiconducting materials to form logic circuits, and semiconductor lasers to transmit information, has had a transformative effect on our lives over the last 50 years. In this presentation, I will discuss the role that the mathematician George Boole (1815 – 1864) and the scientist John Tyndall (1820 – 1893) played in the development of integrated circuits and optical communications, based on their mid-19th Century contributions exploring the algebra of symbols and how light behaves in a falling jet of water.

Biography:  Paul K. Hurley is a Senior Research Scientist at the Tyndall National Institute (www.tyndall.ie), and a Research Professor in the Department of Chemistry at University College Cork (www.ucc.ie). Paul leads a research team exploring alternative semiconductor materials and device structures aimed at improving the energy efficiency in the next generation of logic devices. In particular, the group are working on III-V and 2D (e.g., MoS2, WSe2) semiconductors, and exploring how the traditionally passive back end of line in integrated circuits can be turned into an active part of the chip, including logic functions and multilevel non-volatile memory elements. The group are also researching the use of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) systems for the creation of solar fuels through water splitting reactions. He may be reached at: paul.hurley@tyndall.ie.

For more information, contact Prof. Subramanian Iyer (s.s.iyer@ucla.edu)

Date/Time:
Date(s) - May 02, 2019
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Location:
EE-IV Shannon Room #54-134
420 Westwood Plaza - 5th Flr., Los Angeles CA 90095